Tag Archives: tasty

New home

1 Dec

So I guess I haven’t posted in a year but lots of changes this year. We bought a home so now I have a small yard!

Planting as much stuff as possible in the ground and this week, I just planted some asparagus crowns into the ground.

I first started this blog when I planted asparagus in containers so it seems fitting to start the new chapter with asparagus too!

This time they’re in the ground!

I just bought these bareroot crowns from Walter Anderson in San Diego and decided to do put them somewhere I initially wanted ornament plants.

So still a little unconventional, these asparagus are partially going to ornamental for landscaping to hide an ugly fence. The spot is narrow and mostly shaded in the winter but I am hoping I will get some sun as the seasons change.

Supposedly, it can take some shade so let’s see how it goes!

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Tasty pitaya! Ripe and so tasty

13 Nov

We decided to pick the pitaya dragon fruit even though it didn’t appear as bright pink as some of the pictures. I did ready it takes about 30 days from flower to ripe. So I think i ended up picking it at 45 days. The tentacles coming off the fruit started having slightly dry looking edges so I decided it was ready. It was a risk as apparently they don’t ripen anymore once picked. 

I am so glad I did as it was on a tiny bit of the soft side but still so good and sweet and not mushy!!!
   
    
    
 
Once I photographed it inside, it actually appeared more pink in the images so maybe that’s why other people’s looked so much brighter than mine! 
  Here’s #2!

Going to pick him at under 45 days!
Look at the colour change of #1

   
    
 

Nature gave me a very tasty giant strawberry but also took away my only Tango mandarin

28 Apr

Growing these in a long wooden box. Pleasantly surprised to find this giant hiding.

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But unfortunately, the recent April showers must’ve knocked off my last Tango mandarin. These have been growing forever. I feel like it has taken at least six months to get the this size. Bummer I found him on the floor.
The other tiny mandarins also dropped off the tree recently.

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Potting up Mango from seed.

25 Jan

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My mango seed #2 is looking good. I know most people will wait until it starts rooting and growing leaves before putting it in soil but I have had bad success transferring sprouting seeds in that way so I decided to pot it up already.

Also there is some debate as to which direction to orient the seed in the dirt. Some say flat, some say rounded end down. I figured in the “wild” the seed will always lay flat so I went with flat.

Here he is! Last time I will see the seed!

Hopefully in a few weeks I will see a shoot rising from the soil. I used organic Happy Frog potting mix.

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Mango from seed sprouting already!

10 Jan

The first attempt seed is still not doing anything after three days in the ziplock bag. However, attempt #2 which I only started yesterday is already sprouting! It soaked in water for a little over 24 hrs and I just wrapped it in a damp paper towel and put it in a ziplock. Check out these pics 🙂 how exciting!
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Growing mango from seed. Attempt #2

8 Jan

I checked on the mango seed I started a couple of days ago (First attempt) and the paper towel was all brown so I changed it out with a fresh one. That seed was dark brownish in some areas when I pulled him out. As I don’t know if this was normal, and I still had another organic mango left, I decided to have another seed going at the same time. Here are the pics from my seed number two!

This one was a lot easier to get out. Knowing where the to look for a seam helps so if you want to try this, maybe get a couple of mangoes so first one you can experiment on and if you mess up, you have a back up.

I scrapped at the narrow edges of the mango seed husk until I saw the seam. The first attempt I spent a long time cleaning the slippery mango and fibers off the husk. No need. Just use a butter knife and scrape at the sharp edge until you see what looks like a seam. If you can’t see it, try the opposite sharp edge of the husk.

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Growing Mango from Seed - Husk of Mango seed pry opened with a butter knife.

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Growing Mango from Seed - Husk of Mango seed pry opened with a butter knife.

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Growing Mango from Seed - Husk of Mango seed removed - This inner seed had a papery cover on it.

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Growing Mango from Seed - Husk of Mango seed removed - inner seed with papery cover

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Growing Mango from Seed - Husk of Mango seed removed - inner seed with papery cover

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Growing Mango from Seed - Husk of Mango seed removed -papery cover removed. Here is the inner seed next to the tasty fleshy mango

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Growing Mango from Seed - Husk of Mango seed removed -papery cover removed. Here is the inner seed next to the tasty fleshy mango

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Growing Mango from Seed - Inner Seed soaking in a cup of water. Will leave this one over night, then wipe it down, and wrap loosely in damp paper towel, then place in ziplock bag and then the hard part - wait!

All Peaches gone! See you again next year!

19 May

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I have finally picked all my fruits from my little Tropic Beauty Peach tree. These ones were almost as big as the ones you can buy in the store!
I think I like the flavour of the Tropic Prince Peach better. It had a melting texture with a tarter taste. The tropic beauty was yummy too but over ripe on one side of the fruit, and a little crunchy on the other.

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You can see a little cracking on the fruit as when I picked it, the end was so soft my finger squashed it a bit but I was surprised to find the stem end still a bit hard.

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Tropic Beauty is definitely semi- cling stone. Now I know what that means. 🙂
Before any of my fruit were ripe, I half expected there to be a giant stone in the middle of them and very little fruit – glad to say I am pleasantly surprised there was much more than a couple of bites to each peach. This is one of my most satisfying gardening moments – harvesting my own homegrown peaches within a year of owning these tiny trees.

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I can’t wait til next year! Hopefully my trees will recover from the bacterial spot and produce even more fruit.